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THE WORDS OF PRINCE PHILIP, THE CURRENT HITLER

Here, speaking for themselves, are Lord Bertrand Russell and Prince Philip, the unacknowledged éminences grises behind the architects of the Obama Nazi health plan.

- Lord Bertrand Russell -

But bad times, you may say, are exceptional, and can be dealt with by exceptional methods. This has been more or less true during the honeymoon period of industrialism, but it will not remain true unless the increase of population can be enormously diminished. At present the population of the world is increasing at about 58,000 per diem. War, so far, has had no very great effect on this increase, which continued through each of the world wars.... War ... has hitherto been disappointing in this respect ... but perhaps bacteriological war may prove more effective. If a Black Death could spread throughout the world once in every generation, survivors could procreate freely without making the world too full.... The state of affairs might be somewhat unpleasant, but what of it? Really high-minded people are indifferent to happiness, especially other people's.
The Impact of Science on Society (1953)
The white population of the world will soon cease to increase. The Asiatic races will be longer, and the negroes still longer, before their birth rate falls sufficiently to make their numbers stable without help of war and pestilence.... Until that happens, the benefits aimed at by socialism can only be partially realized, and the less prolific races will have to defend themselves against the more prolific by methods which are disgusting even if they are necessary.
The Prospects of Industrial Civilization (1923)
- Prince Philip -
In the event that I am reincarnated, I would like to return as a deadly virus, in order to contribute something to solve overpopulation.
—Reported by Deutsche Press Agentur (August 1988)
I just wonder what it would be like to be reincarnated in an animal whose species had been so reduced in numbers that it was in danger of extinction. What would be its feelings toward the human species whose population explosion had denied it somewhere to exist.... I must confess that I am tempted to ask for reincarnation as a particularly deadly virus.
—Foreword to Fleur Cowles, If I Were an Animal (1987)
I don't claim to have any special interest in natural history, but as a boy I was made aware of the annual fluctuations in the number of game animals and the need to adjust the ``cull'' to the size of the surplus population.
Down to Earth (1988)
Everyone thinks it's to do with not enough food, but it's really that demand is too great—too many people. Basically, it's a little embarrassing for everybody. No one quite knows how to handle it. Nobody wants their family life to be interfered with by the government.
—Philip interview with Britain's TV channel ITV1 on the world food crisis, aired May 12 and 13, 2008, and quoted in a Sunday Times article on May 11.
We talk about over- and underdeveloped countries; I think a more exact division might be between underdeveloped and overpopulated. The more people there are, the more industry and more waste and the more sewage there is, and therefore the more pollution.
—Address to Edinburgh University Union (1969)
I realize that there are vital causes to be fought for, and I sympathize with people who work up a passionate concern about the all too many examples of inhumanity, injustice, and unfairness; but behind all this hangs a deadly cloud. Still largely unnoticed and unrecognized, the process of destroying our natural environment is gathering speed and momentum. If we fail to cope with the challenge, the other problems will pale into insignificance.
—Fairfield Osborne Lecture, New York City (1980) [Fairfield Osborne, father and son, were leading anti-population activists]
Human population growth is probably the single most serious long-term threat to survival. We're in for a major disaster if it isn't curbed—not just for the natural world, but for the human world. The more people there are, the more resources they'll consume, the more pollution they'll create, the more fighting they will do. We have no option. If it isn't controlled voluntarily, it will be controlled involuntarily by an increase in disease, starvation and war.
People magazine (1981)
The simple fact is that the human population of the world is consuming natural renewable resources faster than it can regenerate, and the process of exploitation is causing even further damage.... All this has been made possible by the industrial revolution and the scientific explosion and it is spread around the world by the new economic religion of development.
—Address to the Joint Meeting of the All-Party Group on Population and Development and the All-Party Conservation Committee in London (1987)
What has been described as the "balance of nature" is simply nature's system of self-limitation. Fertility and breeding success create the surpluses after allowing for the replacement of the losses. Predation, climatic variation, disease, starvation—and in the case of the inappropriately named Homo sapiens, wars and terrorism—are the principal means by which population numbers are kept under some sort of control. Viewed dispassionately, it must be obvious that the world's human population has grown to such a size that it is threatening its own habitat; and it has already succeeded in causing the extinction of large numbers of wild plant and animal species.
Down to Earth (1988)
There may be disagreements about the time scale, but in principle there can be little doubt that the population cannot go on increasing indefinitely. Resources presently being used will not last for ever and pollution in its broadest sense, unless severely checked, is bound to increase with population and industrial activity.
—Address, Salford University Degree Ceremony (1973)


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